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                  Nutrition

Carbohydrates 
Fat
Fiber
Protein
Minerals
Vitamin
Water
Other nutrients

Intestinal bacterial flora Balanced diet
Malnutrition
Food guide pyramid
Energy
Obesity and weight control
Pregnancy and lactation
Infancy (01 year of age)
Young children (16 years)
Adolescents (1020 years)
Ageing
Illness
Anorexia nervosa and bulimia
Vegetarianism and veganism
Diet selection
How to interpret food labels
Food allergy and food intolerance
Food toxicity
Avoiding food-borne illness
Exercise
Protein
Carbohydrate
Fat
Alcohol
Water
Dietary fibre
Beverages
Cholesterol
Vitamins
Minerals 

  The human digestion system contains a population of a range of bacteria and yeast such as Bacteroides, L. acidophilus and E. coli which are essential to digestion, and which are also affected by the food we eat. Bacteria in the gut fulfill a host of important functions for humans, including breaking down and aiding in the absorption of otherwise indigestible food; stimulating cell growth; repressing the growth of harmful bacteria, training the immune system to respond only to pathogens; and defending against some diseases.

  Balanced diet is a diet which consists of all the essential nutrients in a required proportion with water and roughage

  The protein requirement of athletes, once the source of great controversy, has settled into a current consensus. Sedentary people and recreational athletes have similar protein requirements, about 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body mass. These needs are easily met by a balanced diet containing about 70 grams of protein for a 70 kg man or 60 grams of protein for a 60 kg woman. Protein intake in excess of that required to build muscle (and other) tissue is broken-down by gluconeogenesis to be used as energy. In muscle-development training, and athletes, all requireapproximately 2 grams of protein per day per kilogram of body weight, roughly double that of a sedentary persons. Older athletes seeking primarily to maintain developed muscle mass require 2 to 3 g per day per kg.Protein intake in excess of that required to build muscle tissue is broken-down by gluconeogenesis to be used as energy

 The main fuel used by the body during exercise is carbohydrates, which is stored in muscle as glycogen- a form of sugar. During exercise, muscle glycogen reserves can be used up, especially when activities last longer than 90 min. Because the amount of glycogen stored in the body is limited, it is important for athletes to replace glycogen by consuming a diet high in carbohydrates. Meeting energy needs can help improve performance during the sport, as well as improve overall strength and endurance

  Malnutrition refers to insufficient, excessive, or imbalanced consumption of nutrients. In developed countries, the diseases of malnutrition are most often associated with nutritional imbalances or excessive consumption. Although there are more people in the world who are malnourished due to excessive consumption, the lack of nutrients necessary for the growth and maintenance of vital functions.Nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder.